For those of you currently developing apps for iOS, we’ve been adding lots of content to the Windows Store apps Dev Center. We’d like to help you get started building Windows Store apps, so we updated the section on Resources for iOS devs with lots of new info and sample code. We know you feel comfortable with Xcode and UIViewControllers, and we want you to feel just as comfortable with Visual Studio and XAML.

We’ve also updated the section on getting Windows running on your Mac, and with Windows 8.1 Preview available as a free download, there’s never been a better time to give it a try. Did you know you can now read our docs and watch our videos right on your iPhone or iPad?

Documentation for iOS developers in the Windows Dev Center

We’ve added content to the following sections:

We’ve focused on helping you quickly find the Windows equivalents of basic iOS tasks, from changing the appearance of buttons, to tips on using Visual Studio. We also introduce the unique Windows 8 controls in a way that hopefully makes a lot of sense if you know iOS.

One Dev Minute videos

That’s not all: we’ve been busy making videos too. They’re perfect for those times when you want a quick overview of a topic before diving into the details. This one gives an introduction to Windows 8.


Download this video to view it in your favorite media player:
High quality MP4 | Lower quality MP4

This video shows how using Xcode to build iOS apps compares to using Visual Studio to build Windows Store apps.


Download this video to view it in your favorite media player:
High quality MP4 | Lower quality MP4

Other videos give you a look at charms, grid views, table views/list views, and icons/tiles so you can quickly understand the Windows 8 features and how they compare to any counterparts in iOS.

If you like longer videos, check out the videos from Build sessions focused at developers who are familiar with iOS.

New Windows 8.1 features

The recent introduction of Windows 8.1 Preview added a lot of new features for developers. There are new and improved XAML, HTML and JavaScript controls, support for new screen sizes, DirectX enhancements, new text-to-speech APIs and lots more. There’s a complete list of what’s in the Product Guide for Developers. Have a read and see what fires your imagination. With new controls and features, you might start thinking about re-writing your iOS apps to make use of them all, rather than trying to get a simple port working.

Wrapping up

We know well that you love your iOS development, and we want you to bring that same love—not to mention great design and attention to detail—to your Windows Store apps. Let us know how we can help in the comments below!

Your Windows Dev Center team